Monday, October 3, 2022

It's Monday! What are you reading? 10-3-22

It's Monday! What are you reading? Is a wonderful community of readers, teachers, and librarians. Hosted by Jen over at Teach Mentor Texts along with Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers, participants share their reading adventures from the past week along with their reading plans for the week ahead.

My Monday posts are generally just a highlight of what I've been reading during the week so if you'd like to see all that I've been reading, follow my Goodreads page.


Books I recently read and enjoyed:


Love That Story: Observations from a Gorgeously Queer Life by Jonathan Van Ness
In the follow up to his memoir, Over the Top, Jonathan Van Ness brings a side of depth and social justice to his sunny disposition in this series of intersectional essays.


Come Fly the World: The Jet-Age Story of the Women of Pan Am by Julia Cooke
I really enjoyed learning more about American history (Cold War, Vietnam War, etc.) through the lens of what it was like being a stewardess for the most glamorous airline of the jet age.


Forever Home by Henry Cole
A young boy wants a dog so badly that to prove to his dads that he can be responsible, he walks an empty leash every day. One day, he discovers a stray dog that he wants to rescue and his dads finally decide he's ready for his own dog. The only problem is... they can't find him when they go looking for him.


Sonny Says Sorry by Caryl Hart, illustrated by Zachariah OHora
A sweet book about how apologies should be accompanied by action to make right the wrong you did.


Books Aren't for Eating by Carlie Sorosiak, illustrated by Manu Montoya
A delightful book that sends the message that books fill you up... but if you're a goat, you need to remember that they shouldn't fill up your stomach, but rather your brain. :)


The More You Give by Marcy Campbell, illustrated by Francesca Sanna
I love that this book is described as a modern-day response to The Giving Tree. Because instead of giving of yourself so much that you become nothing but a stump for your child to sit on, this is a book that shows how giving can give back... by creating a whole forest.


Everything in Its Place by Pauline David-Sax, illustrated by Charnelle Pinkney Barlow
Nicky loves her school library so much that she spends her recess helping the librarian re-shelve books. But when the librarian has to be gone for a week at a conference, Nicky must actually go to recess, which she is dreading. This is a sweet story about taking risks, getting out of our comfort zones, and also still embracing a love a books as one navigates outside that comfort zone.

Currently reading:

Odder by Katherine Applegate


Currently reading with my ears:

The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper


Purchasing books from any of the above Bookshop affiliate links support independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale. 

Monday, September 12, 2022

It's Monday! What are You Reading? 9-12-22

 

It's Monday! What are you reading? Is a wonderful community of readers, teachers, and librarians. Hosted by Jen over at Teach Mentor Texts along with Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers, participants share their reading adventures from the past week along with their reading plans for the week ahead.

My Monday posts are generally just a highlight of what I've been reading during the week so if you'd like to see all that I've been reading, follow my Goodreads page.


Check out my current giveaway:


I recently reviewed:
My Pet Feet by Josh Funk


I recently read and loved:
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg grew up to witness the poverty and injustices of the Great Depression and World War II. For that reason, they found themselves identifying politically with the communist party. Unfortunately for them, this was probably the worst time in American history to identify as a communist… right after the end of World War II and the start of the Cold War resulted in a groupthink of paranoia that led the U.S. into the McCarthy era Red Scare that ruined many people’s lives with a simple accusation of being a communist. Unfortunately for the Rosenberg’s that accusation also came with charges of espionage… of selling nuclear secrets to the USSR and a death sentence.

This novel in verse covers a very intense story in American history and will make readers want to learn more about the Rosenbergs. 

Nana, Nenek, & Nina by Liza Ferneyhough
A beautiful celebration between cultures of grandmothers' love

Patchwork by Matt de la Peña, illustrated by Corinna Luyken
Matt de la Peña always knows how to tug on those heartstrings in his profound and literary picture books. In Patchwork he reminds adults and kids alike that we all contain multitudes; we are a patchwork of interests, ideas, ideals, strengths and weaknesses.

Lunch from Home by Joshua David Stein, illustrated by Jing Li
This book is a great conversation starter about food and family traditions and why those things need to be respected (and embraced!) at school. The story is a model and invitation to show kids that they can and should view different foods with curiosity rather than disdain. We don’t all need to bring sandwiches and chips for lunch every day, nor should that be the expectation in a country as beautifully diverse as ours.

If You're a Kid Like Gavin by Gavin Grimm & Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by J Yang
A wonderful picture book to add to the conversation that trans kids are humans to be loved and cared for, not problems to be solved


Currently reading:

Odder by Katherine Applegate


Currently reading with my ears:


Come Fly the World: The Jet-Age Story of the Women of Pan Am by Julia Cooke


Purchasing books from any of the above Bookshop affiliate links support independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale. 


Dear Wild Child Giveaway

 A father's poetic lament to his daughter over the loss of their family home they built to a wildfire. The author's note at the end is a perfect thesis to the book: "The climate is changing. Weather is becoming less predictable and more extreme. We will lose what we love. And to fix what's broken, we will all need to become resilient and more empathetic, collaborative, and creative."

"The art echoes the text’s emphasis on beauty rather than loss. . .In the event’s aftermath, the affecting story’s tone remains openhearted, concluding with sentiments that encourage resilience and reflect on the nature of home."
Publishers Weekly

"It’s a touching sentiment that reminds readers of all ages that our lives are defined not by our material possessions but by the memories we make... Intricate and emotional."
Kirkus Reviews

In the shade of ancient redwood trees, by a creek, not far from the ocean, a father builds a house for his newborn daughter, where she grows up wild and strong in their coastal canyon home. When a wildfire takes back their beloved house, a father writes his now-grown daughter a letter telling her it’s gone. Inspired by the real letter the author wrote his daughter, this poignant story—written together by father and daughter—joyfully declares that a home is more than just wood and stone; it is made of love and can never be taken away. You carry home with you wherever you go.

About the Author & Illustrator
Wallace Grayce Nichols
 is a student of sustainable design, problem solver, and water lover. Her father, 

Dr. Wallace J. Nichols, is a marine biologist and the author of the bestselling book Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do. Home is the slow coast of California. Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Drew Beckmeyer is a fine artist, illustrator, and elementary school teacher. He lives in Northern California. Website | Instagram

Additional Links:

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Friday, September 2, 2022

My Pet Feet by Josh Funk, illustrated by Billy Yong

When the letter R suddenly goes missing, a little girl has to figure out where it went, or else run the risk of having pet feet instead of a pet ferret. There are also a slew of other mishaps that a missing letter R might cause you to encounter... such as a galloping hose instead of a horse, a flock of cows instead of crows, and a babbling book instead of brook just to name a few.

I can't even imagine the mental gymnastics that had to occur in order to write a book with no Rs, but Josh Funk manages to make mental gymnastics fun and entertaining. This book is no doubt going to be an uproarious read aloud favorite with groups of kids.


My Pet Feet by Josh Funk, illustrated by Billy Yong
Published: August 23, 2022
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Pages: 48
Genre/Format: Picture book
Audience: Primary
Disclosure: Digital copy provided by author


Purchasing from the above Bookshop affiliate link supports independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale. 

Monday, August 1, 2022

It's Monday! What are you reading? 8-1-22

It's Monday! What are you reading? Is a wonderful community of readers, teachers, and librarians. Hosted by Jen over at Teach Mentor Texts along with Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers, participants share their reading adventures from the past week along with their reading plans for the week ahead.

My Monday posts are generally just a highlight of what I've been reading during the week so if you'd like to see all that I've been reading, follow my Goodreads page.


Last week I read and loved:
I'm obsessed with this book. I spent a better part of yesterday making a bittersweet Spotify playlist and a TikTok review because I am currently in ADHD hyperfixation mode. Cain's book Quiet changed my life by giving me permission to embrace my introversion. And this book equally changed my life by giving me permission to embrace my melancholy side. 

Frizzy by Claribel A. Ortega, illustrated by Rose Bousamra
An important middle grade graphic novel about a young girl who wants to embrace her natural curly hair rather than being forced to go to the salon every week with her mami to straighten her hair. This book is an important mirror for young Black girls who want to embrace their natural hair and a window for white readers who are used to seeing their physical features as a cultural default.


Currently reading:
Victory. Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice by Tommie Smith, Derrick Barnes and Dawud Anyabwile


Currently (still) reading with my ears:


Purchasing books from any of the above Bookshop affiliate links support independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale. 

Monday, July 25, 2022

It's Monday! What are you reading? 7-25-22

It's Monday! What are you reading? Is a wonderful community of readers, teachers, and librarians. Hosted by Jen over at Teach Mentor Texts along with Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers, participants share their reading adventures from the past week along with their reading plans for the week ahead.

My Monday posts are generally just a highlight of what I've been reading during the week so if you'd like to see all that I've been reading, follow my Goodreads page.


Last week I read and loved:

I Can Make This Promise by Christine Day
A really lovely and important middle grade book that tackles a difficult topic but isn't heavy-handed about it. It is a book about family history, family secrets, and indigenous identity. It's also a great entry point to discuss the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 that is alarmingly being brought again before the Supreme Court this fall

Swim Team by Johnnie Christmas
This book’s premise can be distilled down as New Kid meets Bring It On but with swimming instead of cheerleading. It’s a story that imparts a lot of hard truths about why so many Black Americans never learned or teach their kids to swim, but it’s mostly a page-turning story of friendship, teamwork, and overcoming adversity.


Yes We Will: Asian Americans Who Shaped This Country by Kelly Yang
Wonderful book that connects narrative elements along with peritext and backmatter to tell the story of inspiring Asian Americans. I love that each page spread featured a different Asian American illustrator, further highlighting the accomplishments of Asian Americans.


The Surprise by Zadie Smith and Nick Laird, illustrated by Magenta Fox
What a delightfully odd and heartwarming story about a guinea pig that does Judo and doesn't know her place in a family of pets that are very dedicated to their schedules. The delightful oddness of the story puts me in mind of Phil Stead's picture books. 


Currently (still) reading:


Currently reading with my ears:





Monday, July 18, 2022

It's Monday! What are you reading? 7-18-22

It's Monday! What are you reading? Is a wonderful community of readers, teachers, and librarians. Hosted by Jen over at Teach Mentor Texts along with Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers, participants share their reading adventures from the past week along with their reading plans for the week ahead.

My Monday posts are generally just a highlight of what I've been reading during the week so if you'd like to see all that I've been reading, follow my Goodreads page.

Here are some fun book-related TikToks I made last week:

@bibliophilebeth When this is the weather in July, you mark yourself as unavailable in your calendar and sit outside and read #librariansoftiktok #schoollibrarian #booktok ♬ original sound - catherineoharasbebe

Last week I reviewed:


Last week I read and loved:

Hummingbird by Natalie Lloyd
There’s a teacher in the story that says a pen is a direct line to a person’s heart. Well, Natalie Lloyd’s pen draws a whole lot of lines to readers’ hearts.

The Queen of Kindergarten by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newman
MJ, with her tiara and rainbow-colored braids, absolutely slays on her first day of kindergarten... by being helpful and kind and having a great time while doing it.

Like by Annie Barrows, illustrated by Leo Espinosa
A picture book that brilliantly sets up the thesis that humans are more alike than different by showing the ways we are alike/different to other objects. A great read aloud for Preschool-1st grade classes.


Currently reading:


Currently reading with my ears:

I Can Make This Promise by Christine Day


Purchasing books from any of the above Bookshop affiliate links support independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale. 

Tuesday, July 12, 2022

Emotional Inheritance: A Therapist, Her Patients, and the Legacy of Trauma by Galit Atlas, PhD

"When we learn to identify the emotional inheritance that lives within us, things start to make sense and our lives begin to change. Slowly, a door opens, a gateway between present life and past trauma." 

I wasn't planning on reading AND finishing this book in one day. I was just going to sit down and read the introduction to see if this was a book I wanted to keep reading or if I would take it back to the library. But before I knew it, I was on page 100 and couldn't stop reading. The only reason I didn't finish it in one sitting is because I needed to come up for air since the subject is so intense. Otherwise I would have finished it in one sitting; I was that riveted.  

Emotional Inheritance was not what I was expecting. When I picked it up, I fully anticipated a book full of psychological jargon and written in expository format. Instead, the book is written entirely in narrative format, and each chapter is the story from one of Atlas' clients as it illustrates anecdotally how someone inherited the trauma they are currently wrestling with in their lives. While many people will say the anecdotal nature and lack of cited research discredits this book, I would argue that Atlas' intended audience means she used this format to compel the reader to seek out more information in the field of epigenetics and inherited trauma. The page-turning nature of this book will mean that the reader likely will seek out more information about this field and want to learn more.

But speaking of lack of citations, my only issue with this book is Atlas' frequent references to Freud which, I get that Freud got some things right, but given his lack of credibility in our present day, it feels like there should have been more context to citing his work since many people now find him so problematic.  

Overall though, I thought what made Emotional Inheritance an effective read is how it compels the reader to learn more about the way trauma is baked into our DNA. 


Emotional Inheritance: A Therapist, Her Patients, and the Legacy of Trauma by Galit Atlas, PhD
Published: January 25, 2022
Publisher: Little, Brown Spark
Pages: 288
Genre: Nonfiction/Self-Help
Audience: Adults
Disclosure: Library Copy


Purchasing from the above Bookshop affiliate link supports independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale. 

Monday, July 11, 2022

It's Monday! What are you reading? 7-11-22

It's Monday! What are you reading? Is a wonderful community of readers, teachers, and librarians. Hosted by Jen over at Teach Mentor Texts along with Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers, participants share their reading adventures from the past week along with their reading plans for the week ahead.

My Monday posts are generally just a highlight of what I've been reading during the week so if you'd like to see all that I've been reading, follow my Goodreads page.


I recently reviewed:
Run: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, L. Fury, and Nate Powell


I recently read and enjoyed:
Don't Eat Bees: Life Lessons from Chip the Dog by Dev Petty, illustrated by Mike Boldt
Chip is a very smart dog. He knows all of the things dogs should and shouldn't eat. Maybe.


A Sky-Blue Bench by Bahram Rahman, illustrated by Peggy Collins
A heartwarming story about a young girl who struggles at school sitting on the floor every day due to her disability so she decides a bench for herself.


There Was a Hole by Adam Lehrhaupt, illustrated by Carrie O'Neill
A conversation-starter about what grief and loss feels like


Ice Cream Face by Heidi Woodward Sheffield
This book takes you on quite the journey -- one of love, excitement, anticipation, observation, impatience, savoring, devastation, and then a heartwarming conclusion. All done over a scoop of ice cream. I adore the joyful, bright illustrations, particularly the ice cream scoops which are actual photographs.


Where Butterflies Fill the Sky: A Story of Immigration, Family, and Finding Home by Zahra Marwan
Zahra Marian’s unique story of immigration is told vaguely enough in the main story itself to keep readers curious and asking questions but then more specificity is given in the backmatter.


Standing in the Need of Prayer: A Modern Retelling of the Classic Spiritual by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Frank Morrison
A stunning and emotionally charged book that takes a classic African American spiritual and modernizes it.


Currently reading:

Hummingbird by Natalie Lloyd

Currently reading with my ears:

Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole by Susan Cain


Purchasing books from any of the above Bookshop affiliate links support independent bookstores and gives me a small percentage of the sale.